Not Finished But Resting - April 30, 2021

As professional caregivers it seems that we are programmed to put other people’s needs first and have a hard time turning this off at the end of the day and giving ourselves permission to take care of ourselves.

Posted
May 1, 2021
Graphic of head with talk bubble above

Not Finished But Resting - April 30, 2021

As professional caregivers it seems that we are programmed to put other people’s needs first and have a hard time turning this off at the end of the day and giving ourselves permission to take care of ourselves.

Posted
May 1, 2021

"Self care is so important. When you take time to replenish your spirit, it allows you to serve others from the overflow. You annot serve from an empty vessel." - Eleanor Brown

JFS Friends –

One thing that I have noticed throughout my career is that those in the helping professions tend to have the hardest time taking care of themselves. As professional caregivers it seems that we are programmed to put other people’s needs first and have a hard time turning this off at the end of the day and giving ourselves permission to take care of ourselves.

It is not uncommon for me to hear colleagues expressing the feeling that taking time for themselves is selfish when there are so many people in need. I often try to remind people that rest is not laziness or selfish – it is a purposeful activity that is required to keep us healthy and able to do our jobs and to be present for our clients, family and friends.

Author Jennifer Williamson says:

“Real rest feels like every cell is thanking you for taking care of you.
It’s calm, not full of checklists and chores. It’s simple: not multitasking; not fixing broken things.”

Therapist, minister and author, Wayne Miller talks about the conscious decision that is required to carve out space for rest. He reminds us that:

“If we only stop when we are finished with all our work, we will never stop, because our work is never completely done. With every accomplishment there arises a new responsibility...

Sabbath dissolves the artificial urgency of our days, because it liberates us from the need to be finished.”

For those of us that observe Shabbat, this time is programmed into the rhythm of our life every week. If Shabbat is not part of your tradition, you can create a tradition of your own that serves the same purpose. You can choose a day and time that you will carve out for yourself and dedicate it to self-care, reflection and renewal.

For many, time spent in nature is part of rest and renewal. John Muir, the famous environmentalist found his place for healing in the nature – he famously said:

“Come to the woods for here is rest.“

and

“Allow nature’s peace to flow into you as sunshine flows into trees.”

Wishing you moments of peace and calm when you can let go of the cares of the week and focus on responding to the quiet voice within each of us that is calling out for care and attention.

Be kind to yourself,

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Carl E. Josehart, MSW (he/him/his)

Chief Operating Officer

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