A Moment or a Movement - April 21, 2021

As we contemplate on the meaning of the moment that we are living in, consider choosing one action that you will take to help transform this moment into movement and help our community move closer to the realization of justice in our lifetimes.

Posted
April 23, 2021
Book open with lights pouring out of it

A Moment or a Movement - April 21, 2021

As we contemplate on the meaning of the moment that we are living in, consider choosing one action that you will take to help transform this moment into movement and help our community move closer to the realization of justice in our lifetimes.

Posted
April 23, 2021

Turn an overwhelming situation into a positive one by doing good deeds in memory of the person who you were closest to. Kindness will help that person's legacy of love live on by starting a chain reaction and inspiring others.

JFS Friends – 

As we listened to the news yesterday many of us were able to breathe a little easier that there was a measure of accountability and justice for the family of George Floyd. While yesterday’s news represents a milestone, we recognize that work continues and there is much yet to be done to heal and to push forward on the journey towards justice and equality.

There is a beautiful tradition in Judaism that we do mitzvot (meritorious/charitable acts) in someone's memory as a living tribute that benefits present and future generations – in this way the individual we are remembering continues to live on in our memories and their life continues to be an influence for good in the world.

For those of us that care about racial justice and equality perhaps this a moment when we can consider committing ourselves to continuing the work as a way to honor the memories of those among our friends, relatives and community leaders who have dedicated their lives to creating a more just and equitable community.

Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel, reflected on his participation in the march from Selma to Montgomery on March 21, 1965 and the connection between his activism and his faith when he said:

“For many of us the march from Selma to Montgomery was about protest and prayer.
Legs are not lips and walking is not kneeling.
And yet our legs uttered songs.
Even without words, our march was worship.
I felt my legs were praying.

Heschel reminds us with his beautiful words that prayer is most effective when worship is paired with action – when we find ways bring to life the values that we celebrate in our prayers.

Ruth Bader Ginsberg expands on this idea when she said:

“Fight for the things you care about. But do it in a way that will lead others to join you.”

Ginsburg wisely points out that our impact can grow exponentially when we are able to lead others to join with us.

If we are able to follow the advice of Heschel and Ginsburg then perhaps we will live to see the day when the words of Amos (5:24) come true and:

“Justice wells up as waters and righteousness as a mighty stream.”

As we contemplate on the meaning of the moment that we are living in, I hope that you will consider choosing one action that you will take to help transform this moment into movement and help our community move closer to the realization of justice in our lifetimes.

Take care of each other,

Carl Josehart's signature

Carl E. Josehart, MSW (he/him/his)

Chief Operating Officer

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